Te Puni Kokiri

Language preference: Māori English

Language preference: Māori English

Te Waipounamu

There are three Te Puni Kōkiri Offices in Te Waipounamu. These are in Christchurch, Dunedin and Invercargill.

Office locations

Our offices can be reached via contact details below.

See detailed map

Christchurch

BNZ Centre Level 1
120 Hereford Street
Christchurch 8011
P O Box 4741, Christchurch 8011
P:
0800-875-839
E:
tpk.te-waipounamu@tpk.govt.nz
F:
03-355-6309

See detailed map

Dunedin

Level 1
Colonial House
258 Stuart Street
Dunedin 9016
P O Box 180, Dunedin 9054
P:
0800-875-839
E:
tpk.te-waipounamu@tpk.govt.nz
F:
03-474-9576

See detailed map

Invercargill

Level 1
Menzies Building
1 Esk Street West
Invercargill 9810
PO Box 1769, Invercargill 9840
P:
0800-875-839
E:
tpk.te-waipounamu@tpk.govt.nz
F:
03-214-9179

Back to top

Back to top

Our Rohe

Te Waipounamu region is the largest of Te Puni Kōkiri regional areas, covering approximately 49 percent of New Zealand (134,672,000 hectares).

The regional boundaries starts north of Kaikōura on the east coast of the South Island, goes south to Rakiura (Stewart Island) and up the West Coast to Kahurangi Point.

Back to top

Regional Manager

David Ormsby (Waikato, Ngāti Maniapoto, Ngāti Tūwharetoa, Ngāti Raukawa ki te Tonga)

Regional Manager, Te Waipounamu

He’s spent 11 years leading the Te Puni Kōkiri team in Te Waipounamu, but David Ormsby does not hesitate when asked about the most memorable part of the job.

“Absolutely, it was working with Te Puni Kōkiri as a whole, in response to the earthquake. I’ve never seen anything like it."

Read more about David.

Back to top

Iwi in our Region

There are three iwi represented in Te Waipounamu region:

  • Ngāi Tahu
  • Kāti Mamoe
  • Waitaha.

Back to top

Iwi radio stations

Back to top

Local events and updates

Latest events and updates for this section are listed below.

  • Te Puni Kōkiri: Te Waipounamu Regional Profile 2017

    Te Puni Kōkiri measures a range of outcomes that fall within Whakapapa (te reo Māori and connection to iwi), Oranga (whānau well-being and whānau housing), Whairawa (whenua and whanaketanga), and Whanaungatanga (Crown-Māori relationships). This publication provides an insight into the growth and development of Māori within Te Waipounamu and within these outcomes.

    More details

  • Te Puni Kōkiri: Te Waipounamu Regional Profile 2017

    • Date: 10 October 2017

    Te Puni Kōkiri measures a range of outcomes that fall within Whakapapa (te reo Māori and connection to iwi), Oranga (whānau well-being and whānau housing), Whairawa (whenua and whanaketanga), and Whanaungatanga (Crown-Māori relationships).

    This publication provides an insight into the growth and development of Māori within Te Waipounamu and within these outcomes.

    Read more

  • Speed-Dating for a Better Whare

    • Date: 27 September 2017

    More than a dozen whānau in Murihiku have safer and warmer homes after a day of speed dating with builders, insulators, roofers and finance experts.

    Read more

  • The value of a Whānau Ora Approach

    • Date: 25 September 2017

    New research from Lincoln University and Ihi Research shows how public investment in the Whānau Ora approach provides economic as well as social and cultural benefits to the country.

    Read more

  • Staff Speak Te Reo Māori All Month at Te Puni Kōkiri

    • Date: 22 September 2017

    Several Te Puni Kōkiri staff members have taken on the challenge to speak more te reo Māori at home and at work in the month of September as part of Mahuru Māori.

    Read more

Back to top