Te Puni Kokiri

Te reo ka pīrangitia: Māori English

Te reo ka pīrangitia: Māori English

Whānau Ora puts whānau at the centre of decision-making about their future.

It recognises the collective strength and capability of whānau to achieve better outcomes in areas such as health, education, housing, employment and income levels.

Whānau Ora is a revolutionary public sector initiative because it devolves the delivery of Whānau Ora services to community-based commissioning agencies.

These agencies work with partners, providers and navigators to deliver customised support and services to whānau.

A wealth of data and evidence has also been collected that demonstrates the benefits of Whānau Ora.

About Whānau Ora

Whānau Ora is about increasing the wellbeing of individuals and whānau to lead full lives and uses the power of whānau to improve the wellbeing of individuals and whānau. It provides whānau with appropriate services and support so they can become more self-managing and achieve their aspirations.

Whānau Ora puts whānau and families in control of the services they need to work together, build on their strengths and achieve their aspirations. Learn more.

Why Whānau Ora?

Whānau-centred

Whānau Ora puts whānau at the centre of decision-making about their future.

It recognises the collective strength and capability of whānau to achieve better outcomes in areas such as health, education, housing, employment and income levels.

 

 

Whānau-focused

Whānau Ora is a revolutionary public sector initiative because it devolves the delivery of Whānau Ora services to community-based commissioning agencies.

These agencies work with partners, providers and navigators to deliver customised support and services to whānau.

Contact Details

If you want to access Whānau Ora services contact your relevant commissioning agency.

Te Pou Matakana works with whānau and families in the North Island.

Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu works with whānau and families in the South Island.

Pasifika Futures is dedicated to working with Pacific Island families across the country.

Each commissioning agency works with local partners, providers and navigators to deliver a coordinated service based around the needs and aspirations of your whānau.

For other enquiries about Whānau Ora, you can contact your local Te Puni Kōkiri office, email whanauora@tpk.govt.nz or phone 04 819 6000.

Monitoring, research and evaluation

Te Puni Kōkiri has an important role in monitoring and evaluating Whānau Ora as a unique public service model. The Commissioning Agencies are also engaged in evaluating their activities to understand what Whānau Ora is achieving for whānau.

This research incorporates producing reports on research into, and monitoring and evaluating the outcomes and effectiveness of Whānau Ora. This research aims to provide an overall picture of the performance and implementation of Phase Two of Whānau Ora.

This research is important because it will enable Te Puni Kōkiri to understand the impact that Whānau Ora is making in order to inform future planning, design, and investment decisions. It will also continue to build the evidence base around Whānau Ora outcomes to support the future growth of Whānau Ora activities.

Whānau Ora Outcomes

The Whānau Ora Outcomes Framework, agreed to by the Whānau Ora Partnership Group, made up of Iwi and Crown representatives, is the principle measurement for indicating the success of Whānau Ora.

These seven outcomes are:

  • Self-managing;
  • Living healthy lifestyles;
  • Participating fully in society;
  • Confidently participating in Te Ao Māori (the Māori world);
  • Economically secure and successfully involved in wealth creation;
  • Cohesive, resilient and nurturing; and
  • Responsive to living and natural environments.

The following diagram illustrates the seven outcomes for Whānau Ora:

Whānau Ora Outcomes

Latest Reports

Te Puni Kōkiri have released its latest reports to provide valuable insights into the first year of the Whānau Ora commissioning agency model (2014-2015).

These reports will contribute towards the management, development and assessment of Whānau Ora as a unique public service model.

2015/2016 WHĀNAU ORA ANNUAL SUMMARY REPORT

This report describes the way Whānau Ora was delivered in 2015/16 and the results achieved. It is a snapshot of Whānau Ora as a whole; its purpose is to understand what activity has occurred across the various components of Whānau Ora and how those activities have contributed to gains for whānau.

View the the full 2015/16 Whānau Ora Annual Summary Report [PDF, 567KB]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Formative evaluation of the Whānau Ora commissioning agency model

The second phase of Whānau Ora (2014 – 2017) moves the investment delivery closer to communities and whānau via non-government Commissioning Agencies.

This report was commissioned by Te Puni Kōkiri to examine how well the commissioning model is working across the three Commissioning Agencies, and to identify opportunities for improvement. The evaluation will inform further development of approaches to commissioning for Te Puni Kōkiri and other government agencies.

View the Formative evaluation of the Whānau Ora comissioning agency model report

 

2014/2015 Whānau Ora Annual Summary Report

This report describes the way Whānau Ora was delivered in 2014/15 and the results achieved. It is a snapshot of Whānau Ora as a whole; its purpose is to understand what activity has occurred across the various components of Whānau Ora and how those activities have contributed to gains for whānau.

View the full 2014/2015 Whānau Ora Annual Summary Report

 

Understanding whānau-centred approaches: Analysis of Phase One Whānau Ora research and monitoring results

This report presents findings from the research and monitoring programmes undertaken during the first phase to determine:

  • which components of whānau-centred approaches were evident during implementation, and the degree to which they aligned with recommendations from the Taskforce on Whānau-centred Initiatives
  • the different ways whānau-centred approaches were implemented across Whānau Ora collectives
  • main barriers and enablers to these approaches
    the impacts on whānau
  • the implications for both Whānau Ora as an initiative and Whānau Ora as awider social sector approach.

View the full Understanding whānau-centred approaches report

Read more Whānau Ora resources and publications

Independent Research

The facts speak for themselves. Whānau Ora has been the subject of several independent research studies. See what they found.

Report on the Performance of General Practices in Whānau Ora Collectives as at September 2015

This report focuses on the performance of general practices in Whānau Ora collectives – using results from the software package HealthStat, which collects an anonymous summary of patient health information from general practices in Whānau Ora collectives. The Ministry of Health publishes these performance reports on a quarterly basis.  Find out more.

More effective social services

The Productivity Commission aims to provide insightful, well-informed and accessible advice that leads to the best possible improvement in the wellbeing of New Zealanders. Whānau Ora is one of four case studies that the Commission has selected in response to the inquiry terms of reference. The case studies draw out lessons that can be applied more widely across the social services landscape rather than draw conclusions about the effectiveness of particular services. Find out more.

Whānau Ora: the first four years

Whānau Ora has been a success for many families who now have a plan to improve their lives. For example, some whānau are working towards getting their young people living and working on their ancestral land. The government spending to achieve this has been small, but the importance for the whānau is significant. Find out more.

Whānau Ora is Life-Changing

Since 2010, the Whānau Ora kaupapa has been life-changing for thousands of men, women and children.

“My life has turned right around since then – and now I’m a respected, retired person having the time of my life. Thanks to the help they gave me.”

Michael Bristow (Laddy), Ngāpuhi
Whānau Ora client

Hear from other whānau and families.

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