Ngai Māori me Ngā Hua o te Mātauranga

Education and Health

Education has an influence on other aspects of wellbeing beyond employment and income. One such area is health. Māori with higher levels of qualifications were more likely to live longer over the period of 2001 to 2004. Mortality rates`6 measure the number of deaths in a population, providing a useful indicator of health that is directly related to life expectancy. Mortality rates among Māori were higher for males than females, but both males and females with higher levels of qualifications had significantly lower mortality rates.

Mortality rates for males with post school qualifications (792 deaths per 100,000) are 17.6 percent lower than for those with school qualifications (961 deaths per 100,000) and 36.9 percent lower than for those with no qualifications (1255 deaths per 100,000). These differences in mortality rates are even more pronounced for females, with rates for individuals with post school qualifications (360 deaths per 100,000) 42.0 percent lower than for those with school qualifications (621 deaths per 100,000) and 62.6 percent lower than for those with no qualifications (962 deaths per 100,000).

Graph 3: Māori Mortality Rates by the Highest Qualification Attained from 2001 to 2004

 Māori Mortality Rates by the Highest Qualification Attained from 2001 to 2004

Source: Statistics New Zealand, 2006 Census of Population and Dwellings

 

 

6 Mortality rates used are age standardised annual mortality rates per 100,000 people calculated for the Māori population between 25 and 74 years of age. Mortality rates are calculated by anonymously and probabilistically linking census records with mortality records to create cohort studies. This process is not without error, thus mortality rates may vary by between 6 and 21 percent from the values quoted above.

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