Needing to kōrero and engage with Māori? 

Some tools and resources to assist with:

  • Finding a translator
  • Guidance on bilingual signage
  • Using macrons
  • Receiving daily Māori news updates
  • Promoting events and opportunities
  • Building your list of key Māori relationships
  • Reaching Iwi radio stations

Do you need translators?

If you are seeking translations Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori have a National Translators and Interpreters Register – that lists people who have been certified under the Māori Language Act 1987 as translators and/or interpreters.

Looking at Bilingual Signage?

A guide has been developed to support government’s strategy to revitalise te reo Māori in the public sector. Māori – English Bilingual Signage: A guide for best practice.

Need macrons?

In case you don’t have these already, there is an easy way of setting up your keyboard for macrons

Would daily Māori news updates be useful?

As you know in 2004 we set up Wā Karere, a daily (Mon-Fri) collation of Māori news. Due to its popularity it became an external service. If you have anyone to be added to the distribution list please email comms@tpk.govt.nz.

Promoting events and opportunities?

Rauika is an online events and opportunities calendar, if you would like to post to Rauika, click here to view or post.

Are you wanting to build your list of key Māori relationships?

We have a directory of Iwi and Māori Organisations called Te Kāhui Māngai. The information is also collated by 13 different regions, please note while it is not a complete list it includes:

  • iwi identified in the Māori Fisheries Act 2004
  • mandated bodies for Treaty of Waitangi settlement purposes – this includes Treaty negotiations and post settlement entities
  • iwi authorities and hapū groups for the purposes of the Resource Management Act 1991
  • some national and urban Māori organisations
  • urban and institutional marae.

Do you get enquiries for a list of key Māori contacts or media?

We have our very own directory of Iwi and Māori Organisations called Te Kāhui Māngai. The information is also collated by 13 different regions, and publically available. There is also a website with Māori / Iwi radio stations, also publically available. Feel free to refer people to

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