Te Puni Kokiri

Language preference: Māori English

Language preference: Māori English

Publications about Demographics

  • Te Puni Kōkiri: Te Tai Hauāuru Regional Profile 2017

    • Published in 2017

    Te Puni Kōkiri measures a range of outcomes that fall within Whakapapa (te reo Māori and connection to iwi), Oranga (whānau well-being and whānau housing), Whairawa (whenua and whanaketanga), and Whanaungatanga (Crown-Māori relationships). This publication provides an insight into the growth and development of Māori within these outcomes in the Te Tai Hauāuru region.

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  • Future Demographic Trends for Māori – Part One

    • Published in 2017

    Future Demographic Trends for Māori – Part One is the first in a series of three reports by Te Puni Kōkiri which collate a range of baseline population statistics, trends and projections for Māori.

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  • Te Puni Kōkiri: Waikato-Waiariki Regional Profile 2017

    • Published in 2017

    Te Puni Kōkiri measures a range of outcomes that fall within Whakapapa (te reo Māori and connection to iwi), Oranga (whānau well-being and whānau housing), Whairawa (whenua and whanaketanga), and Whanaungatanga (Crown-Māori relationships). This publication provides an insight into the growth and development of Māori within these outcomes in the Waikato-Waiariki region.

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  • Te Puni Kōkiri: Te Waipounamu Regional Profile 2017

    • Published in 2017

    Te Puni Kōkiri measures a range of outcomes that fall within Whakapapa (te reo Māori and connection to iwi), Oranga (whānau well-being and whānau housing), Whairawa (whenua and whanaketanga), and Whanaungatanga (Crown-Māori relationships). This publication provides an insight into the growth and development of Māori within Te Waipounamu and within these outcomes.

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  • Māori in Australia - Fact Sheet

    • Published in 2014

    Australia has become home to a significant number of Māori, either born there or having migrated from New Zealand.

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  • Every Māori Counts

    • Published in 2012

    Why do Māori leave New Zealand and move to another country to live? Which countries do they settle in and why? How are they faring in their new home? Do they maintain connections with New Zealand and will they ever return? These are some of the questions looked at in an online survey of Māori and non-Māori New Zealanders living overseas.

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  • Māori: Demographics for Economic Return

    • Published in 2011

    Te Puni Kōkiri commissioned research to help create an evidence base on the impacts of demographic trends and their implications for Māori economic futures. The report shows that Māori demographic trends – alongside those of non-Māori New Zealanders, present the Māori population with significant opportunities.

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  • Māori Families and Households

    • Published in 2011

    Māori families and households represent the core of wider whānau support networks. This fact sheet examines trends in Māori families and households, and their influence on the lives of Māori.

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  • Beyond 2020: Population Projections for Māori

    • Published in 2010

    When and where is the Māori population expected to grow? This fact sheet presents population projections for Māori, identifying the regions and age groups that are most likely to experience change in the coming decades.

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  • Making Ngā Kaihanga Hou a reality in Auckland

    • Published in 2009

    There is no doubt of Auckland’s importance to New Zealand overall as well as to Māori. Nearly one quarter of New Zealand’s total Māori population live there and just over 11 percent of people in the Auckland region identify with the Māori ethnic group.

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  • Māori Health

    • Published in 2009

    A fact sheet presenting information on general Māori health and well being during 1996 - 2007.

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  • Māori in Australia

    • Published in 2007

    This report uses data from a survey and interviews completed in 2006 by more than 1200 Māori across Australia. The Trans-Tasman flow of people, money, ideas and language means that Māori development should no longer be sēen simply in terms of the New Zealand nation state. 261 pages.

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  • Māori in Australia

    • Published in 2007

    A summary of Te Puni Kōkiri’s research report titled Māori in Australia – Ngā Māori i te Ao Moemoeā, which gives the most accurate picture yet of how many Māori there are in Australia, why they went there, and how they are faring. It also highlights the fact that while Māori are living and working in another country, they still consider themselves to be Māori and most are still calling New Zealand ‘home’.

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  • Māori Self-employment by Region

    • Published in 2007

    Although the number of self-employed Māori has increased since 2001, the percentage has remained steady. This fact sheet uses information from the 2006 Census to provide a more detailed picture, and show regional differences. August 2007. 2 pages.

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  • Māori Women in the Workforce

    • Published in 2006

    Key information about Māori women in the workforce. 2 pages.

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  • Māori Youth

    • Published in 2006

    Facts about Māori youth (aged 15 to 24 years). 2 pages.

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  • Māori Graduates

    • Published in 2006

    Data from the Ministry of Education about the characteristics of Māori tertiary graduates up to 2003. 2 pages.

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  • Māori in the Workforce

    • Published in 2006

    Information from Statistics New Zealand’s Household Labour Force Survey about Māori participation in the workforce. 2 pages.

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