Te Puni Kokiri

Language preference: Māori English

Language preference: Māori English

Te Puni Kōkiri works for Māori to be secure, confident and expert in their own language and culture.

Culture encompasses a wide range of things, from traditional and contemporary arts to cultural practices such as the gathering of kai moana. People’s affiliations to iwi, hapū, whānau and marae are important threads in the fabric of Māori culture.

Te reo Māori remains a crucial cultural asset for Māori and is protected under the Treaty of Waitangi. Te Puni Kōkiri has a lead role in the government’s efforts to support the revitalisation of the Māori language.

We support Māori to protect, sustain and grow their reo, taonga, mātauranga and tikanga. We want more people speaking Māori and for whānau, hapū and iwi to identify and pursue their cultural development priorities.

Events and Updates

Latest events and updates for this section are listed below.

  • Tā Mason Durie

    Groundbreaking research on Māori urbanisation

    • Date: 16 November 2017

    A leading Māori health specialist Sir Mason Durie is praising what he is calling groundbreaking research into the impacts of urbanisation on Māori.

    Read more

  • Team ‘WAQ’ developed the anti-bullying watch which lets the wearer alert an adult anonymously when bullying strikes.

    Rangatahi taking on big business

    • Date: 16 November 2017

    Māori secondary school students have shown off their flair for entrepreneurship in a series of successful workshops that have recently wrapped up.

    Read more

  • Te Puni Kōkiri kapa haka group just before it went onstage.

    Public sector brings it to the stage at Te Kōnohete 2017

    • Date: 16 November 2017

    Wellington’s Pipitea Marae was abuzz with Te Kōnohete in November, a kapa haka event where several government agencies take to the stage to celebrate Māoritanga. 

    Read more

  • Pou Hākinakina Canaan Tuhura works with rangatahi Blake Bird (18) and Angela Gilmore (23) to help them realise their dreams in sport and life.

    On a PATH to Success

    • Date: 16 November 2017

    It has been nearly 25 years since Te Papa Tākaro o Te Arawa became the country’s first iwi and Māori health sports trust. Today, working with Whānau Ora, it continues to find new ways of helping whānau achieve their health and wellbeing goals.

    Read more

  • Principal of Avonside Girls High School Sue Hume, Waitangi speech representative Monika Kern, Te Hinenga Te Hēmi, her parents Tracy and Hēmi Te Hēmi.

    “Her identity is more important to her than ever”

    • Date: 15 November 2017

    A proud father says a new programme to connect Christchurch rangatahi with their Māoritanga helped his teenage daughter regain strength after her brother died.

    Read more

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